Friday, November 1, 2019

Sweet Idea


Recognize these?  Of course, they're gelato spoons.


My teacher friend, Michele is like me.  She loves to repurpose anything and everything to use in the classroom.  She gave me a handful of these spoons to use for my students to track their words while reading.  Maybe it will help  your young students to spoon up some good focus.

Speaking of tracking, I'm a little late to remind you of a previous post on tracking words with creepy fingers.   Maybe you can catch some of them on Halloween clearance.

 


Sunday, September 15, 2019

Sight Word Activity

 Early emergent readers and children who struggle to learn to read sometimes have difficulty realizing a word that starts with a capital letter is the same word as the identical word that is all lower case or is in a different font.

I made this game for a couple of my second graders who are finding remembering sight words quite a challenge.  They'll get a little fine motor practice as well.  See the rubber-tipped tongs?  I found them at Walmart.  Adds a little fun element to the game as they search for matches.

I also found at Walmart some colored laminating sheets.  Didn't know they made such.  The top layer is clear, and the bottom layer is a translucent color.  I used light blue card stock for this game.  When I was laminating, I accidentally put the colored side on top of one of the sheets.  You can see the darker sheet in the top picture.  Fortunately, it's still readable.

Friday, September 6, 2019

News Flash--Light

I was in my teacher-friend, Sharon's, first grade classroom today.  She was busy at the teacher table while children were at centers-typical first grade routines.  What was not typical was the way she gained the attention of one little guy whose noise level was a little higher than what was needed.  Without missing a beat with what she was doing, she grabbed the flashlight on her table and waved it back and forth on the little one's face.  He responded instantly and dialed it down as he got back on task.  

 

Brilliant!!

 

No need to raise her voice above the children's work noise to grab his attention.  No negativity added to scold a child into doing the right thing.  Just a silent reminder.  It's obvious she has spent lots of time during our first three weeks of school to build in procedures in a positive way.  Time spent this way early on reaps benefits all the rest of the year. 

Wednesday, September 4, 2019

The Sea of Japan





This book was a departure from my usual reading fare, children’s books, books about teaching reading and helping children with reading disabilities, and books related to essential oils (love my Young Living).  The Sea of Japan was a 344-page vacation. 

 

This book was school related in the sense that the main character, Lindsey, was a teacher.  She left a horrible teaching assignment in Boston and wound up in Hime, Japan, a small fishing town, teaching English.  While trying to snap a picture by the local bay, Lindsay slipped, knocking herself out after hitting her head, and fell into sea.  Fortunately, Ichiro, the brother of one of her students, saw her fall and rescued her.  That began a friendship which became a business partnership.

 

Lindsay added fishing with Ichiro on his commercial boat to her teaching duties.  She used what she had learned about fishing from her grandfather, who was a commercial fisherman in Massachusetts. Over time she not only developed skill as a fisherwoman but became involved along with Ichiro in trying to save the fishing industry in Hime.  The detailed plan she, Ichiro, and her friend Judy, developed seemed to be the answer to the demise of Hime.  However, their plan was hijacked by Lindsay’s ex-boyfriend, who showed up in Japan and swept her off her feet again. 

 

Ichiro and Lindsay were looked to as leaders by the Hime fishermen. The friends frantically tried to save Hime.  things just continued to deteriorate in their town, but their relationship became closer.  Lindsay felt responsible for the bahid things happening, and she made a last-ditch, all-or-nothing gamble to rescue the town she had come to love.  The poignant ending left me in tears.

 

I found this book to be an interesting read.  Not only does it give insight into Japanese culture, but it explained how the fishing industry worked there.  I even learned a little about sushi making as Lindsay became apprenticed to a master sushi chef in Hime.



Japanese author, Keita Nagano, has won awards for his writing.  He lives in Nevada with his wife.  He is the ultimate American-experience junky, having visited all 50 states, all 30 major league ballparks, and the top 60 big cities in the U.S.  For my next read I want to track down his award-winning missing-child thriller, Kamikakushi.

 

 Next month most of us teachers will have fall break.  The Sea of Japan would make an entertaining stay-cation read for you.

 

#theseaofjapan  #keitanagano

Friday, August 23, 2019

Sit Spots


I had never seen these large Velcro dots before until my teacher friend, Marilyn, put them in the hall for her students.  How handy is that?!

 

They are about 3" wide and made of plastic with heavy Velcro backing.  They grip the carpet really well, so I don't think they will be bothered by foot traffic or the vacuum cleaner.

The ones I found on Amazon are 5" wide and very reasonably priced.

If any readers have used these, leave a comment letting us know if they served your purpose well and how they lasted.

Saturday, August 17, 2019

Back to School for Year 47

It's that time once again.  Still enjoying my job, my calling. So I'll keep going until that changes.

 

Just whipped out this set of bottle lid alphabet manipulatives with glittery stick-on letters.  Notice I put a line on the bottom edge of each lid so the kids can orient the the letters correctly.

 I put letter stickers on craft sticks that are just a bit wider than a regular popsicle stick.  Kids can alphabetize them according to upper or lower case, draw a stick and identify the letter, or use to spell words.

Tuesday, July 23, 2019

July 23 Money Monsters



Okeoma Moronu Schreiner brings us a picture book adventure featuring Kai, a young boy with a lively imagination and a tendency to worry over everything. The Missing Money: Money Monsters is debuting this month.  It is the first of a trilogy geared to introduce young children to the world of personal finance in a way to which they can relate.

Going to the bank for the first time with his dad, Kai is excited about depositing his money.  However, before he can do that, a monster gobbles up every bit of it! His dad doesn’t even notice what happened.  Kai devises a detailed plan to recover his money and then lets his parents know about the money-eating monster.  

His mom explains about the mysterious ATM monster and how his money is completely secure.   His dad gives him a magic ATM card so he can check on his money to make sure it stays safe.  That knowledge helps Kai have a little less to worry about in his world.


Attorney, former elementary school teacher, wife, mom, and author, Okeoma Moronu Schreiner (her Instagram: @finkidlit) has given parents a good tool to start helping their children understand how finances work in an age-appropriate manner.  She even includes a page of discussion points to give children a deeper understanding of the concepts presented in this cute story.


Illustrator Sandhya Prabhat, who is from India, is also an animator.  Her unique style of artwork adds to the charm of this book.  If you have primary-children you'll want to include this book in your home library.  It would make a nice gift for your children's teachers too.  You can order your copy here.

Like this post and leave a comment to be entered in a drawing for a copy of this cute book.
 
#TheMissingMoney     #MoneyMonsters     #MoneyLessons     #KidsWhoRead     #DiverseBooks

Thursday, July 11, 2019

A Boon for Blended Families


Over the years I have read and enjoyed the imaginative books of Clark Burbidge.  I first read his Giants in the Land trilogy for ages 7 and up.  Then I devoured his Star Passage trilogy, for ages 10 and up. The latest of Burbidge's work I’ve read is a non-fiction book that debuted this July 4.  Living in the Family Blender: 10 Principles of a Successful Blended Family  is written in tandem with Clark's wife, Leah.


They became engaged in 2004 with 10 children between them.  Then began their journey to attempt to join the 12 of them into one cohesive family.  This book is a result of what they learned traversing the hills and valleys of blended family life in the intervening years.

They approach this book and their family life from a Christian perspective.  I appreciate the fact they don't present themselves as experts in the arena of blended families.  They present 10 principles they developed along the way and transparently include many personal examples from their family's experiences to illustrate each one--both successes and challenges.  The Burbidges look at all aspects of bringing together their children and how the ex-spouses play into things as well. 

Each chapter is devoted to one of the principles.  The Burbidges explain the principle and the why behind it.  The book lays out a clear road map for families navigating the "blender" experience.  The couple emphasizes how the pre-trip planning for this journey should begin long before the actual marriage. 

Nearly everyone is touched by a blended family, either as part of one or as a friend or relative of someone in a blended family.  Families impacted by factors, such as divorce, death, or abandonment, come together to form a new family unit with all members bringing along their baggage.  The Burbidges help the reader understand the complexities of steering around the chug holes of uniting a blended family, establishing good communication, and listening actively.

This is a must-read for couples contemplating merging their families.  It is very enlightening for anyone who has a blended family close to them.  Teachers would benefit from reading the book as well to help them understand what many of their students are going through at home.  Pastors and family counselors will want this book in their libraries as an excellent reference.  Buy your copy here.  Check out their Facebook page.